Anzac Day

Anzac Day is a public holiday and day of remembrance in Australia where we, as a nation, salute the fallen. Anzac Day now bigger than just the anniversary of the landing of the Australian and New Zealand troops on Gallipoli in 1915. It’s a day where we remember all Australians who have served and fallen in war and on operational service. The song I was only 19 is one which we often hear on Anzac Day even though it was written by John Schuman for those young conscripts who went to Vietnam. It’s a powerful song and now iconic in our culture. The band Redgum was one which represented those who could easily be forgotten because they had fallen in war.

There is currently quite a push on the internet so that we remember the right people for the right reasons. Netizens are questioning why we promote and endorse stupidity so easily on the internet when there are others so much worthier. This is the message of I was only 19. It is worth noting John Schuman was a teacher in a southern suburbs school and moved from there into his musical, political and social justice career. In 2015 he wrote Every Anzac Day, a song about aboriginal soldiers who served in the Australian military. He has been teaching us well about how we can deal as a nation with the impact and implications of war for individual lives.

Penmanship

Master penman Jake Weidmann is an amazing teacher and student. His capacity to learn and apply his knowledge becomes self-evident. He is one of twelve master penmen in the world and he is 20 years younger than the others. He gives what he is doing his heart and soul and then puts in all the hours of application to be the shining light he is. He epitomises the art of learning, the art of knowing and now the art of teaching. This video can show us how someone can be encouraged to learn and know. The bottom line is commitment.

ICT – where now?

This video is 5 years old , has great music and sums up well where we have been and how we have striven to get technology into classrooms. We have worked hard on developing 21st century learning skills. The video also points to where we need to be looking now:

We need to recognize we can no longer simply educate students to become technology users – and consumers – without also helping them learn how to become critical thinkers about technology and the social issues surrounding its use.

Cynthia L. Selfe

It’s about finding the right tool for the job, looking at what is appropriate and not appropriate in terms of apps and software, looking for the most effective way or ways of presenting information or gathering information. Students are surrounded by technology out of school. As teachers we need to be aware of what is popular, what it means, what the social impact is and whether these tools can serve other purposes which would suit our educational needs. As the other Ms. Selfe quote says, we have to pay attention to technology. We have to be aware, share and dare to be different sometimes and allow that all to be peer reviewed. As teachers we need to take safe, well considered steps but if we discuss our ideas and think them through with others, there is no reason we should not try to make sound educational use of what is now a banquet of apps, software, tools and tricks. We are lucky we are connected teachers because we have the opportunity at any time of the day or night to get professional feedback and encouragement . We are never stopped, blocked or held up with what we need to do and we can validate our ideas as we have them no matter when.Our real and virtual connections mean we can be more adventurous and secure in our planning and ideas development.