Hay Day

Hay DayIt’s been a little while since I posted about Hay Day. So how’s it going? Pretty well, really. I bought 3 new horses which meant I had to put in a new stable. Surprisingly, it fit in without too much trouble or over crowding. I don’t need or want different farm layouts. I need more space. I really wish the developers would consider land releases along with all the other lovely releases they have considered recently. The game has become more user friendly in that the developers canvas opinion and work with some of that. With all the new trees and crops it really is getting squishy and not at all aesthetically pleasing. The developers really need to swot up on the current decluttering lifestyle trends and work with us and the times. I have developed all the areas as far as I can . There are no choices for decorating the fishing area and the town is decorated to the hilt. I even have harps on the beach front and my fantastic New Year fireworks item which I was given for participating in one of the  competitions. The graphics on that are so well done and it’s such fun. I can’t believe I am up to level 77. I still remember struggling so hard through the first 14 levels thinking I’d never make it anywhere. Persistence is really encouraged in this game. Every level brings new challenges and new ways of thinking. It is extraordinary how ,when you go to the next level, things change and you suddenly have to reformat your thinking and way of operating or you won’t succeed. You can go from something as simple as having too many eggs to constantly running out. Fortunately, there are plenty of egg people in the brochure. The same cannot be said for most other items. There is still a dearth of variety in the brochures and it seems hard for players to understand if there is no variety we all bottleneck and can’t move forward. When I sell things I put  a variety in the shop and it vanishes quickly . I help others  to expand their farms and fill their river boats and trucks. Then there is always the thing. That thing which becomes a nemesis in your life and the brochure. It used to be chilli popcorn. No one wanted it and no one needed it but it was always there in the brochure. Then it was the pretty red cloche hats. You could never get rid of them. Now it’s tofu hot dogs and who’s surprised about that one? It is interesting how people deal with that. Part of the game is that after a while Greg or Tom will always buy something you can’t sell so some people put in 10 chilli popcorn or 10 cloche hats or 10 tofu hot dogs. That is taking the battle back to the developers. Right now we have a surfeit of map pieces as well and who knows why that is? No one can get rid of them. Why?

Hay Day

HayDayThe thing with HayDay in the 70s level is Grease is the Word. I never have enough oil or butter. I catch up on the cream and then it’s gone. Ditto sugar. The sushi maker sucks up the rice but I can still manage to keep on top of that. My new facilities like the pasta kitchen and the salad bar just use so much oil and butter. The mayonnaise takes butter to make and then the lemon butter takes butter. It turns it into a massive challenge but also a lot of never ending work and dead ends. You have to stop producing and that’s a shame and a bit pointless really. I could keep it simpler and not offer to fill boats with all the different products. It would mean I don’t get the points and other players wouldn’t get the points either. If we all just stick to wool, cotton, wheat and vegetables there is nothing to buy. The red cloche hats are currently swamping the market because there is little call for them. The town folk don’t buy them, they don’t seem to come up on the boats and occasionally there is a call for them on the trucks. I make and keep 4. It can take 3 days to sell them, pretty as they are. I have extended all I can on the farm, the fishing area and town. That was quite an achievement so when the land deed, markers , maps and mallets come up I can now sell them and help others extend their real estate. I haven’t extended the fishing tackle and traps much because that is incredibly expensive with the diamonds. Not sure what that is about. In the 70s level it is always a challenge. Right now I am potato challenged because of the pasta kitchen. We need more plots but we also need more land. The game is not what you think and the complexity changes as you go along. I can remember the first 14 levels being really hard. Then it all choofed along and grew but now I am back to the really hard. I don’t really have the resources to do what the game is asking me to do and so I’d like them to think about the logistics of that. I can fill other people’s boats easily. I cannot always fill my own. I have plenty to sell but I don’t really need the money. I can make some things easily but other facilities are sitting there idle. My sewing machine never stops. I can keep it filled and going. The hat maker is idle most of the time. When I am at the level of making the next hat it will be busy for a while. The pasta maker never stops but the pasta kitchen can’t do much because of the butter scarcity. The dairy needs to be able to produce things faster and the olive trees need looking at. The problem is saws. If you had enough saws you could keep up the oil. Even if you hire Tom you solve the problem for a couple of days and then you are short of olives again. I take it all on face value. I do what I can. I think out what I can but , in the end, the game has to meet us half way and solve some of the shortages so we can play. Players also need to get a variety in their shops so we can all keep playing too. If you can’t make the stuff and you cannot buy the stuff then you grind to a halt. Three words : butter and oil.

Hay Day

Hay DaySeriously, what were they thinking? This is a game with superb graphics and graphics capabilities. The graphic artists have real skills…and a sense of humour. This is not funny. It’s hideous. I won a floating balloon cow. It offends my aesthetic sensibilities so I put it on the farm to show you and now it is safely hidden away in storage. In this game you do not have the option of selling unwanted, tasteless items. So the cow is locked away forever. That’s a shame when it’s so good taking part in the global competitions or spinning the wheel. A cow like that mars your day. Apart from that I am going really well on this game and it never ceases to amaze me how much it can make me think. It poses some interesting dilemmas and forces me to be far more flexible in my thinking that I ever thought possible. I solved my mountain of dead trees and shrubs and realised you get rid of the dead trees and replant  them then you either don’t harvest them or you harvest bits of them and keep them alive. When possible you can harvest them fully and replace them. There is always a shortage of saws and axes and it does impinge on the game. I am now swamped by dead nectar bushes…the white daisy bushes in the picture. Some were nice for decorating but I am now using good land to house dead nectar bushes. They build up quickly so there is no real solution. They ought to last for longer or if you are running hives you need access to more axes. That simple. No, it’s not. You cannot keep hiring Tom at 15 diamonds a day to clean up. It solves the problem temporarily. You can choose not to make honey but a solution ought not be a deficit model. I extended my lobster farm and that is fun and I have my duck salon and that kept everyone amused and entranced at Christmas. It is so clever, funny and well thought out. So why the hideous balloon cow?

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