RedNotebook

RedNotebook

Plan your day

Red Notebook is designed to run on Linux and is like Evernote  – or is that the other way around? I was blogging about  daily planners the other day and it made me wonder what might be available that was Linux specific. I am running  Linux  Mint 17.2 Raphaela on this laptop and I couldn’t install Red Note Book from the package manager. I couldn’t install it from the site either.  I could install it when I used the instructions from launchpad and type them one line at a time into Terminal. RedNotebook then installed itself into the Office section of the start menu.

In RedNotebook you have 3 templates, if you want, for meetings, journeying and personal. You don’t have to use them. You can just put in your own headings and hashtags so you can create your to do lists, notes, reminders, bookmarks…whatever you like just like Evernote. It’s an electronic diary which is not connectivity dependent to work. You back it up to your own chosen spot on your computer. From that point of view it’s good because if you have no internet access then your agenda/diary/journal is still available to you as are all of the backups. To me, this is essential. I don’t want to be plotting and planning and notetaking only to discover I can’t access what I have done because I have no internet connection. Daily planning has to be available, full stop , end of story.

The hashtags work as a sorting function and are displayed to the left. As you build up notes then a word cloud appears so your memory can be jogged if you are searching for something. I really like RedNotebook. I thought the world had stopped doing good things like this so I am really happy. You can read all about it on sourceforge. It operates in more than 30 languages.

Linux Mint 17.2 Raphaela

Raphaela desktopI first encountered Linux Mint 17.2 when I installed it on an HP desktop computer in 2015. 3 years later and I have just installed it on my vintage 2006 HP Compaq Presario V6000 because the Linux Mint Nadia was unsupported. I was actually wondering whether it would run  or not. As it turns out it is running beautifully and very fast . I have a 1.6Ghz chip , 75Gb hard drive and 1.5Gb ram. I really was not expecting 17.2  to be this efficient. There are a couple of issues , though. When I first put Linux Mint on this laptop because it was struggling to run Windows I lost access to wifi capability. No amount of installing Broadcom drivers helped. Not working with Linux Mint 17.2 either and I have tried everything. I have used every fix I can find on the net and everything else I could think of. I am running wifi off an old D-Link wifi adapter. I have a nice little D-Link DWA-131 but that doesn’t work on Raphaela and doesn’t work on Ubuntu 16.04 either. Works instantly on Windows. The fixes do not work. My old D-Link adapter is reliable across all operating systems. That’s interesting.

I can’t load Virtual Box, which I was hoping , and have tried different versions. No matter. I have it on Windows 10 and Ubuntu 16.04. I probably don’t have enough system resources to run it on this Compaq . There is no excuse for the wifi, though . I have read that the onboard wifi card  for this V6000 can just stop working. Why? I have so much vintage technology which still runs fine and to different degrees to efficiency.

The two other odd things about 17.02 on this laptop is the driver manager doesn’t open first time. I always have to click on it a second time, then I have had tabs crashing on me in Firefox, a new experience for me, so I have downloaded and installed Chromium.

Apart from the things mentioned I am really pleased with how this is all going on my old laptop. This is the one I take out and about and I used to use a mobile stick with it which meant it didn’t matter if I could access wifi or not. Now I have to access wifi with a clunky dongle but I am in no way complaining. I live in 2018. I need wifi.  I have yet to see if it will run off a mobile hotspot.

The graphic display on this laptop is still excellent and it loads programmes like Gimp really quickly. It is working really well. Sometimes you just need to be using  an older laptop because you don’t want to put your new one at risk for whatever reason. I like the keyboard on this and it has stood the test of time since the keys are not worn in any way. Raphaela is cruisy and has given my old Compaq such a cool makeover.

Technology changes

lights

Image: campaignlive

The world changes. People used to crank cars to start them. They used to put washing through wringers to get rid of the water. There were lamp lighters in the street. Times change and life and things change with it. Apple’s iconic white MacBook is now vintage. Given it was plastic that might be the right way to go. There is speculation , though, that Apple will move away from its Macs altogether and go with tablets and phones. Macs have been popular with artists , musicians and advertisers. If Apple then improves the iPad Pro will that be enough? A lot of people use their phones and tablets in preference to a laptop or desktop. They like the portability of their device now. A year ago Apple had problems with its new OS Sierra which ought to have been dealt with by now. It’s just brought out a new phone with a different look at the mobile world. Apple never stops inventing and pushing the boundaries.

Meanwhile Microsoft has been working really hard on the Surface which is a laptop/tablet hybrid. It has had to improve the tablet functionality but it is now an  extremely successful device and the iPad Pro could line itself alongside and drive change through competition. iPads have a strong following and are familiar, reliable devices.

What then will  happen to those who need the serious capabilities of a computer? If you like MacBooks, then something like Linux Mint is an option. Apple Macs are built on Unix and so the change to Linux is quite easy. It’s not as slick as Unix , though, but it is easier to customise and can be made to be very slick. It really depends on what you want to do and the world is appearing to make device changes so that everyone has the device they need and that it’s a good one. Some mainly want to stream and look things up. Some need business applications and software. Some need high end graphics capabilities . Some need developer options and so on. We are all different and we are all in need of a good device which suits us. It’s also why you can’t be and know everything about technology. You have to share and you have to pursue what appeals to you . That is how we are moving the world forward now. Yes, there is competition , but collaboration has become a  far more important driver of future thinking and development.

Checkbox for Ubuntu 16-04

I discovered Checkbox at the time I also discovered that if you press the Windows key on your keyboard, the Unity screen comes up. I had pressed the Windows key and there was Checkbox, an app I had not seen or heard of. It is a very thorough system checker and you can see the impressive list of what it checks on the Ubuntu help page. It checks everything! The video I have on this post has no sound but is a live example of what it is like to use Checkbox and how you can select preferences. I got it to check everything and it takes a while. I did have one problem. There was no opt out when the tests came up and it was too hard at the time to get my headset and earphones when Checkbox was doing the test for those. I was under time pressure . When I used the laptop later in the day I nearly blew my ears off with the racket coming from my speakers. Checkbox had set the volume to very high and the sound distortion was incredible. Easily fixed though, and my own fault for not plugging things in. It’s a very comprehensive diagnostic tool and worth knowing about. Checkbox is still an active Ubuntu project so the refinements and improvements are happening all the time. It is very much a community, collaborative project.

Install Steam on Ubuntu 16.04

SteamI tried to install Steam on Ubuntu 16.04 about a month ago. I got a shortcut onto the desktop. I had the hourglass going and I was thinking it was going to load but nothing. I just could not get it past that point. There is all sorts of help on the Net and  all I can say is – persist. Eventually you will get there like I did. I found it easier to install Steam through Terminal:

sudo apt-get install steam

I had followed the instructions on the Linux Config site. Plenty of stuff downloaded through Terminal and then I thought I was there but it just wouldn’t work. I had it loaded on Windows so I just left it. You can also look on the site It’s F.O.S.S.. That site has some other ideas you can try.

steaminstallToday, I decided to try and get it going and a line of code on the ask Ubuntu site was the thing which got Steam updating, functioning and allowing me to log into my account:

env LD_PRELOAD=’/usr/$LIB/libstdc++.so.6′ steam steam://rungameid/730

It took a while but versions of Linux vary, laptop hardware varies and with Linux you have to ensure you have all the bits you need in order for software to work. Happy now!

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