4MAT learning

4MAT learning was developed by Bernice McCarthy in the 1980s and has never really gone away. There is an interesting  paper by Sandra Craven which she submitted in using class 4MAT research as a part of her Masters of Education degree. She concludes:

“Student communication and presentation skills using the 4MAT System showed marked improvement in that student application of the system included audience participation, involvement, and engagement. Furthermore, improved organizational and research skills produced presentations that not only entertained but informed. Although students did become aware of learning styles, to say that they understood their learning style, or were capable of truly honouring their own after only one experience, would be untrue. Only through repeated exposure brought about by the teacher during lessons will students reach this goal. The collaborative learning experience was much more successful than this educator anticipated. This was evidenced not only by student actions during the project, but carry over has been noted in the classroom generally. Furthermore, because of the intensity of the project, students appear to have bonded and are now treating each other with greater respect.”

Teachers have always striven since then to teach students according to their needs and develop materials which will connect with different sorts of learners. Differentiation became the key word and has stayed. Teachers are more than aware their classes are made up of so many sorts of people with different learning needs. When they then have to address curriculum requirements, standards, professional standards, deadlines, national testing and then the documentation around that and put that all into a digital context it is not surprising it becomes overwhelming at times. Teachers put the content value in but the picture can sometimes become muddied with the content  value out because of the complexity of classrooms these days. It doesn’t matter who is teaching what and at what level, 4MAT is a useful way to address content delivery to maximise the outcomes for learners no matter where they are and what they are using in terms of resources. We are all now engaged in lifelong learning. When you have no idea what you know, what you are supposed to know, what you are doing and what you are supposed to be doing then you need tools to clarify the picture so that you can make it realistic and know what is possible at the time.

The content model and the strategies you employ to deliver content will make the path clear for learners. You have to develop a way of connecting with  learners at each point of the learning pathway. AbbyEagle explains  well how to use 4MAT learning :

“The ‘why’ learner needs to know why they need to learn the material.

The ‘what’ person wants lots of information and is looking for facts.

The ‘how’ person wants to know how things work?

The ‘what if’ person learns through a process of self discovery.”

Read more: http://www.abbyeagle.com/nlp-coaching-resources/4mat-system.php#ixzz4Zq1qNo7J

By focussing on those four areas and gathering your resources and delivery around them you have a better chance of being less loss in the array of demands from varying sectors of education. The sector requirements can be fitted in on the basis of clarifying what needs to be done, what needs to be developed and the value it will then provide and the learning goals being set.

Learn coding

vivaLucci is straight to the point and explains clearly how to go about learning code. Code is problem solving. Get a good project and learn to code. Get a reason to code and learn to code. Start with one code and dedicate yourself to that learning and you’ll find a lot of the knowledge and approaches are transferable. I started coding because I was there when Commodore 64s came on to the market as the first home computers. They were clever but to get the best out of them you had to code. The manual came with some codes to learn and I built on that. The school I was in introduced BBC computers which could run some software but we had nothing for languages. I used my Commodore 64 language, borrowed books on BBC computers and learned to write scripts to run programmes to teach languages. I was coding the images, the sequence of events and then collaborating with interested students to develop those programmes further. That’s a point vivaLucci makes. Coding gets you collaborating and collaborating improves your coding. Students couldn’t write the scripts I was writing but they could add to them. We were a mini coding team and grew our knowledge by helping each other. We had a purpose. We were trying to make cool things for the class to use in the computer lab. I have grown from that point and add to it when I want to. Forbes has a good article as to why students should learn coding :

“It also has the potential to bring about a fundamental shift in the way we view technology, turning us from passive consumers into active producers. “There is a massive difference between consuming content and being able to create it,” Sutcliffe adds. “It is important to have agency over the tools you are using.””

Entrepreneur has some good sites to help anyone learn coding. There is so much free material to help you learn and you can go back to it and learn some more when you are ready. Lifehacker has some good recommendations for apps and sites for children to learn coding. For children to learn coding adults have to know what to safely recommend and have a degree of comfort with the software and apps and teachers need some good training which enables them to feel at ease with coding and see the purpose of it:

“But if coding is to become embedded in schools it is going to take a massive effort in terms of teacher-training. Kirsop attests to the shortage of time lack spent on programming skills on her own training course. “There is a long way to go before teachers feel confident enough to teach these skills,” she says.”

Teach kids how to code and you give them a skill for life

Why teach coding?

teach coding

 

This image was doing the rounds on the net earlier on the week and it was surprising how many teachers supported it. That said a lot. It means they do not feel comfortable with coding. Teaching code does not in any way mean that you ignore or replace other curriculum content, personal and social capabilities or wellbeing. As one of the people says in the video if you want to make money or you want to change the world then you need to learn coding. Coding is everywhere and in every part of our life. Healthcare is one of the biggest growth areas for IT development skills and programming skills. Coding is saving lives but we don’t currently have the source code to save the planet. Something to work on.

Kodables has a really good infographic as to why we should teach coding but it supports that with some very helpful downloadable materials to teach it. coding skillsEducational Technology and Mobile Learning

why learn coding

Why learn coding?

has looked at the skills students learn from coding . The video explains it all well, though, and teachers need to be able to find a level of comfort with teaching coding. That cartoon could not have been broadcast and shared on the internet without coding. Researchers collaborate across the planet to solve problems and develop ideas. All of that requires coding. Someone else in the video said that if someone had told her that software was about humanity she would have been able to approach coding in a better way earlier in her life.

coding joke

My new games

I have segames 2017ttled on my new games after a while of hunting around and looking. It has been quite an experience. I have Puzzle Craft on my iPad and that is a brain break game. It’s not very demanding but it is diverting for a while and gives me a chance just to stop and relax a bit. I used FarmScapes on the iPad but have since changed that to my desktop. It’s more demanding than Puzzle Craft but it’s  quite straight forward . The narrative isn’t bad and it includes hidden object and match 3 puzzles to do as well as a bit of farming. Stardew Valley I paid for and downloaded from Steam and it’s been a tough challenge. It doesn’t have support for my game controller and so I am doing everything with a keyboard. That was quite a learning curve. Those who play it on Play Station or X-Box can go so much faster. The pixilated art and retro look of the game are part of its charm. It has really challenged me, my thinking and how I go about games. It keeps me alert and it keeps my brain turning over. From that point of view it is having a big cognitive development impact. I can’t just play it. I have to work it all out. When I do anything there is a big sense of achievement for me because it is so different from anything else I have played. I have just downloaded and installed Anno2205  . I bought the discs thinking the game was on them but you get to download 19 Gb of data!! Could not believe it and it took hours. Lesson learned. I am playing that from the Ubisoft site when I want to but I can play offline. It’s the polar opposite of the other games. Totally high end graphics, total coolness and cutting edge performance. I was so worn out from downloading and installing it I have had hardly a chance to play. I was so glad I knit and crochet so I could get on with things as I monitored the installation. It is different but has the same themes as Stardew Valley. It centres on the environment , the impact of big corporations and sustainability but it comes at it from a different angle and that angle is visually very rich. This game will require me to step up and really sort out my thinking and game playing skills. All my games are designed to contribute to my learning and life and I am happy with my choices now. Taking on new games mean you have to adapt and learn to think outside your comfort zone. It’s a challenge in itself finding games which give you the sorts of challenges you need.

Habitica

HabiticaIt is week 3 of my trial and Habitica now is easy for me to use and I can manage it according to my needs. I am feeding 3 pets to see what happens. I still haven’t felt the need to be part of the questing and gaming aspect of Habitica. You have to be part of a party (group) to follow quests. The idea is they will set you quests to help you or you participate in quests to help yourself. It is all about achieving your goals and improving your life. If the wolf is part of my avatar it is because I am a bit of a lone wolf. You can’t do quests alone or just for yourself and be responsible for your own achievements. This is why the gaming aspect holds no real interest for me. I don’t actually need another layer of involvement to get things done. Others are finding it highly motivating and are loving it and have enjoyed participating in the social, challenging aspect of Habitica. Habitica itself puts out some good quests and challenges to help keep people real, honest and prepared to tackle the tough side of not achieving. It is really noticeable just how much Habitica does to encourage people to do a reality check and then find the tools, quests and people who will help them move forward and upward. It is a very positive, can do approach which is established. I am automatic now in how I organise things and I have shifted some of that stuff to OneNote into tabs so I can follow my project based way of achieving my goals. I really need a pending list and wishlist. Habitica, though, reminds me every day of how much I can and do achieve and so I don’t fall victim to the mindset that says I am not doing much.

#Speak

End the silence.

she's a seeker

It's never too late to seek.

angelalimaq

food, travel and musings of a TV presenter.

irisgassenbauer

bleib ruhig hier

Ang and Mae

Staying Active, While Staying Home

Stepmom Warrior, LLC

Stepfamily Coach supporting,empowering, and inspiring stepparents along their journey.

Our Homesteading Dream

Join our family as we journey towards our homesteading dream!

honeythatsok

stories we tell ourselves

John Wreford Photographer

Words and Pictures from the Middle East

When Am With You... Whitney Ibe Blog!

Inspirational,Motivational, Lifestyle, Daily Living, Positivity, Religion

cancer killing recipe

Just another WordPress.com site

The Seeds 4 Life

Seeds of Inspiration, Wisdom, and Positivity

Living the dream... in Paris, France

Living the dream and the reality that goes along with it... The good, the bad & the everyday things that make life interesting in one of the most beautiful cities in the world. Believe in dreams & fear not the realization of them… for anything is possible. Bellanda ®

Tune Up Success

Redesign Your Life

this tiny blue house

striving to live simply, mindfully and intentionally.