I think therefore I blog

bloggingWhen I first started blogging in 2003 , nobody really took much notice. Later they thought it was a bit peculiar, then it filled them full of mirth, then they had no idea what to think and now people think it must take hours of my life but they seem to like what I do. I certainly get plenty of feedback to tell me that my blogs are helpful to others and that is one of my main reasons for blogging. Once you get the hang of it, it is like anything else, you become adept and efficient. It doesn’t take much time for me to put out a post because I have chosen things which offer me plenty to blog about and practice has only improved what I do. Experience is a great teacher and should never be overlooked.

1. From my blogs I have a spectacular view over cyberspace and the internet.

2. Blogging has helped me learn so I remember things better and I retain that information in a usable form

3. Blogging helps me to solve problems. I often blog about what I’d like, my wishes , hopes , problems and magically it all falls into place.

4. Blogging helps me to understand classroom practice far better than I ever have. I blog about what I do so the implementation is considered, the follow up is thought about and the theory is worked upon in a more methodical way.

5. I am constantly under global peer review. It encourages me. It supports me. It puts me in a global context.

6. As a netizen I can see where I fit , I can add to others and they can contribute to my development.

7. Everything is shared so I am adding to ideas and ways of doing things and in turn I am getting feedback which helps move me forward.

8. I am always enthusiastic and that is sustained because blogging allows me to know. I never reach a dead end or a brick wall .

9. I am constantly learning. To run blogs for as long as I have you have to change and adapt and you have to constantly update your skills and capabilities.

10. It keeps me up to date. I can’t stagnate and I cannot get into a rut.

7 Responses

  1. Cathy- I posted this lovely article to Twitter and Linked and commented as follows: I comment because I think (I don’t blog). I wish I could find the time to blog. I substitute that by commenting and publishing e-books and presentations. Is that enough?

    • You know, we all have our own path to follow and it is important that you feel as though you are changing yourself and others. E-books would be time consuming and would require thought. Comments from you are always helpful and thought provoking so you do comment because you think and then you share those thoughts. It’s good we are all different. It promotes diversity of approach. In that sense whatever anyone chooses to do is enough.

  2. Thank, Cathy and I greatly appreciate your repsponse

  3. […] Blogging builds social capital. It is not a deficit model where you know and others don’t know. You launch your ideas and thoughts into the blogosphere and you will receive ideas and thoughts back which can help you, challenge you and move you on in your ideas and thinking. Education comes from the Latin word educere – to lead forth, to raise up, to erect. We are educators. Anyone involved in education is an educator. They are in the position to lead people on from where they are and raise them to a newer level so they can build the things they are capable of building. Leaders in education are in a prime position for forging connections globally, nationally , regionally and creating influence with regard to educational matters. They have laptops. They have devices. They are no longer locked up in offices far from the madding crowd creating policies, guidelines, structures and memos. They are all now netizens and can take their skills and knowledge out on the Net to further the interests of education. Blogging is a mainstream skill now. Big media and software sites have blogs to support their websites. Blogging puts a human face on an organisation and it allows that organisation to clarify what it is doing, add to what it is doing, troubleshoot, explain, gain ideas. Blogging can be used to problem solve and crowd source ideas and people for projects and plans. Add blogging to a presence on Facebook and Twitter and you can connect with a lot of people to further your aims and gain support for what you are doing. Our national curriculum body, ACARA, and our professional standards body , AITSL, both increased their social media presence last year. They have made some big inroads into connecting with others both locally and overseas and have the figures to prove it. We have got to know them in a more personal way and they are no longer disembodied websites or bits of paper with instructions. They are now real people with real agendas and we can connect with them in a real way. Leadership and Influence has ranked the top 100 Leadership Blogs. It might interest you to see what the web thinks is a top leadership blog. Podnosh has written a good blog post about why leaders should blog and it looks at how leaders can use blogging for problem solving. Blogging adds to personal resourcefulness and strength. It also adds to organisational robustness because it creates connections to strengthen the sense of purpose and clarity of direction. So, if we are all blogging, will we all connect with each other? No. There’s a thing called calibration. You come out on the Net and float your content and some of it sticks and some of it doesn’t. One of the invaluable lessons you learn as a blogger is how to connect with others in a way that gets your content heard and seen. Some are better than others at it. Experience is a great teacher. Does it matter if you are not a big success? Not in my opinion. I have one blog about positive thinking which doesn’t get much traffic. I have had it for a long while. Some of the posts take off. Mostly the posts are for me and my information. They add to me and if they add to others , that’s a good thing but it in no way diminishes the real value they have had for me over the years. Take a look at George Couros’ blog. He knows what he is talking about and there is an authenticity there which will lead you into finding the real value of blogging as a leader. He is a Division Principal and he has taught other educational administrators about the value of social media and how to make it work. Everything on his blog post is linked to more information and practical, contextual help. He is doing what I wrote yesterday in my post as to why teachers should blog. He is sharing all he has learnt and knows and you can see just how strong he is as a leader in an online context. Blogging gives you a voice . It increases your reach and therefore your capacity to influence. I think, therefore I blog. […]

  4. Thanks for sharing this! I began a blog when I first began teaching 2.5 years ago… At the time I thought nothing would stop me. I also felt energised, I loved linking in with others around the world, I enjoyed reflecting and thinking and thinking and thinking. But I quickly found that I would go months/terms without posting anything. I think my thinking caught me out because I second guessed everything that I wanted to share – would it upset people? Would it hit too close to home for others? How could I make it less personal? How could I remain honest yet politically correct? It froze me and for the last year my poor blog has been terribly neglected. Thanks for this post – it has reminded me of why I started in the first place. I am keen to start fresh this year🙂 You’ve inspired me, thanks!

    • One of the things you learn as a blogger is to keep your own voice clear and to put out a message which is helpful ot others. That’s what I think is important. If you write in good faith, the goodness comes back. I appreciate the fact you made an effort to clarify your thoughts on my blog and my post. Just put something up everyday no matter how little. Blog posts can be long or short. It’s the content which counts. Blogging it a habit and the writing becomes easier and more fluent the more you do. It’s the 10, 000 hours concept. https://flatchat.wordpress.com/2014/10/09/master-your-classroom/
      Happy blogging and look forward to your posts!

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